A fun and simple project that works through 3 steps:

  • Step 1: Select and prepare the template.
  • Step 2: Create an overlay shaded layer.
  • Step 3: Apply a Patterned Layer
Photoshop Pattern to 2D Template in 3 Steps

Photoshop’s Pattern to 2D Template in 3 Steps


Step 1: Select and prepare the template.

In the first instance of creating your own 2D template, we need to isolate the template section from the base, in this case, the red t-shirt. The choice of image, a plain colored surface that defines the template area, is preferred. It is easier to identify the outline with better accuracy. There are 2 methods to go about the task, depending on the result, you may need to use both.

First method: Go to Menu – Select – Color Range. Choose ‘Sampled Color’ from the drop-down list and pick up the color of the t-shirt by moving the cursor, with the eyedropper tool showing, over the red shirt. You may need to adjust the ‘Fuzziness’ slider and capture the shirt’s outline with as much accuracy as possible. Click ‘OK’.

Select the 2D Template from the Image

Select the 2D Template from the Image

Second method: On the left, choose the Magic Wand Tool, move the cursor over the shirt and select it. I find this method less satisfactory as it lacks the sensitivity provided by the fuzziness slider in making adjustment. I would stick to the first method before trying this where possible.

Using the Magic Wand to select the 2D template from the image

Using the Magic Wand to select the 2D template from the image

Most of the time, both methods will need some tweaking, for better accuracy, like the corners where the armpits are placed.

Tweaking segments of the 2D template for better accuracy

Tweaking segments of the 2D template for better accuracy.

 

Tweaking with marquee tools. Using a combination of marquee tools to trim or add to the selection to keep the outline as close as possible to the edge of the template.

  • Trimming with marquee tool: With the tool selected, hold down the ALT key while dragging over the affected area with LMB. Release LMB to select.
  • Adding with marquee tool: With the tool selected, hold down the SHIFT key while dragging over the affected area with LMB. Release LMB to select.
  • Tweaking with Selection > Modify will affect the overall outline: Go to Menu – Select – Modify – Expand/Contract and enter the value in pixels. Most of the time a value of 1-2 is just about right.

Step 2: Create an overlay shaded layer.

Duplicate the base image to create a new working layer.

With the outline of the template still in selection mode, inverse the selection from Menu – Select – Inverse, so that the selection highlights the rest of the image where before the selection was on the shirt. While the working layer points to this new duplicate, go to Menu – Edit – Clear, to remove the rest of the image, leaving just the shirt template.

You have to hide the base image with the eye icon next to it on the layer panel on the right, to see what has been done.

Convert this new layer, showing just the shirt, into a contrasting grey tone template in two small steps:

Turn the template image into a B&W copy with Menu – Image – Adjustments – Black &White. The shortcut is Alt+Shift+Ctr+B.

Next heighten the contrast to bring out the differentiating tones. Go to Menu – Image – Auto Tone. I chose the easier way about to manage the contrast of this photo image using ‘Auto Tone’. At times, I find that the other image tools like Curves or Hue/Saturation could work in a better result. Exploring and probing through the set of image adjustment tools, one would find various possibilities.

Set the contrast of the grey tone layer on the 2D template

Set the contrast of the grey tone layer on the 2D template.

This grey tone template will be the overlay layer. For this T-shirt template I chose the blend mode setting, ‘Linear Light’ for stronger contrast, as the pattern that went beneath, has notably strong color values, and need better contrast coming from the blend mode sufficed by ‘Linear Light’ to bring that out . For more muted colored pattern, I generally use ‘Overlay’ or ‘Soft Light’. More probing and exploring ensures in the learning curve!


Step 3: Apply a Patterned Layer

Duplicate the shaded overlay layer and move it below the original. On this new layer, set the blend mode back to ‘Normal’ so that it is completely opaque. Right mouse click on the layer, choose ‘Blending Options’, go to the check box under ‘Pattern Overlay’, select the previously created pattern (Photoshop Pattern from Seamless Tileable Textures) from the drop-down list. Setting the scale of the pattern below 100% will work in a repeated look. Click Ok.

Select a Photoshop pattern and adjust the scale

Select a Photoshop’s pattern and adjust the scale.

Finally, un-hide all 3 layers and arrange the shaded overlay, the newly created patterned layer, and the base image in this order, top down.


Now that the template is ready, we can outfit our model in a range of patterned shirts. 🙂

Selections of patterns one template

All from one template, many patterns


Resources used in project:


 

Published by Trine Epiphany

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